Dark, black aquatint applied over drawing made with sugar-lift technique.

FEATURE

Aquatint

Fine resin dust is applied to the surface of the etching plate, then melted from underneath to melt and harden the dots of resin. When immersed in acid the plate ‘bites’ between the aquatint resin dots, creating a distribution of tiny holes on the plate which print as a tone.

TECHNIQUE

Aquatint

Fine resin dust is applied to the surface of the etching plate, then melted from underneath to melt and harden the dots of resin. When immersed in acid the plate ‘bites’ between the aquatint resin dots, creating a distribution of tiny holes on the plate which print as a tone.

Different tones are achieved by ‘stopping out’ areas of the plate and biting for further time. It is possible to etch a range of tones across the plate from grey to black.

Coarse aquatint uses larger resin lumps to make a more textured speckled aquatint.

Spit bite, sugar lift and white ground techniques are all used together with aquatint.

more printmaking techniques

Woodcut

Knives, gouges and other tools are used to carve an image into a block of wood. Ink is applied using a roller; the cut away areas do not pick up ink as they are below the surface. Paper is placed on top and is printed with a press or by hand.

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Soft ground

Soft ground was invented in the latter half of the eighteenth century as a means of reproducing the grainy qualities of chalk work. It was first used in England by Gainsborough and artists of the Norwich School.

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Monotype

Monotype is a way of making a unique print that cannot be repeated. Using methods from painting and drawing, ink is applied to a surface, and marks can be added or taken away from the surface.

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More Features

All features

Drypoint

Using a sharp pointed tool like an etching needle, an image is scratched into a flat polished sheet of metal such as copper or aluminium. Plastic or card can also be used.

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Linocut

In this relief printing process, an image is carved or etched into a sheet of linoleum. Ink is applied to the lino using a roller; the cut-away areas do not pick up ink. Paper is placed down onto the image and either printed on a press or printed by hand.

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Collecting the Looking

“I love drawing really quickly. I love drawing in really difficult situations. I love drawing in the dark. I like what happens when you can’t see everything or when it’s passed and you have to remember it rather than drawing what it actually looks like, so it’s about the experience of looking as much as what I’m looking at.”

We talk to Michelle Avison about building a resilient artistic practice over 30 years.

Artist:
Michelle Avison

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